Sunday, 19 October 2014

Gammon Cawl and Cheesey Garlicky Scones


So those of you who may have become just a teensy weensy bit sick of the photos I keep posting up here of the clear blue skies and sun-kissed beaches of the West Wales coast during what has been, on anyone's view, an absolutely fantastic summer, will be pleased to know that as I write (07:36 on a Sunday morning) the wind that has been howling around the house for the last 36 hours is still doing a good job of trying to blow us off our hill, the rain squalling in torrential downpours. The stormy - and post stormy - skies have their own special appeal, but granted it's not everyone's cup of tea and I haven't exactly welcomed the reappearance of my waterproof trousers into the daily dog walking routine with joy...





The change in the weather is not all bad (honestly!) - it's like that bit that Nigella writes in, Domestic Goddess, when she talks about the Norwegian Cinammon Buns -  "I've always thought that bad weather has its compensations, most of them culinary."This is a view I subscribe to wholeheartedly. While I'm all for tasty salads and delicate desserts in their place, my cooking comfort zone is in soups and casseroles, big dishes of crumble, jugs of custard... Summer and hot weather can be something of a challenge for me in the kitchen, so bizarrely, while I'm (mostly inwardly) weeping at the inability to get the washing dry and gnashing my teeth at having to pull on waterproof trousers and wellies to walk the dog instead of slopping about in flipflops, my kitchen heart sings for joy as I pull out the slow cooker and stock up on bay leaves...

Cawl is very much back on the weekly menu these days. You may remember a couple of months back, I took the opportunity to wax a bit lyrical about how fantastic the kids had been in the immediate aftermath of the move here. Having spent most of the summer term going to a language centre to be taught on an intensive Welsh course, they are now speaking Welsh with what appears to be alarming fluency (especially when they are bickering), and well versed in all manner of Welsh customs, including bursting unprovoked into renditions of Sosban Fach and Ar Hyd y Nos, Blue will be off to the Millenium Stadium to watch his first international rugby match in a few weeks' time wearing a Welsh rugby shirt...

They are loving their school, and the dinners continue to be a big hit. They enjoyed the school dinners at their old school, but they always came home ravenous. Here, though, there are seconds and thirds on offer. It is not unusual for them to refuse the treat that I meet them with from the bus because they are still full from lunch. So my longheld dream of being able to provide an easy tea on school dinner days is realised. And while making scones is not everyone's idea of an 'easy tea', bear in mind that while the kids would be happy with the cawl alone, I also have the Husband (and myself) to feed, and a little fiddling about in the kitchen is actually quite enjoyable, especially when the majority of the meal is in the slow cooker.

Gammon Cawl

500g piece of unsmoked gammon
150g soup mix (dried beans and pulses)
1 large onions
2 carrots
1 leek (it is Wales after all)
1.2 litres vegetable or chicken stock
1 bay leaf
4 cloves

The night before, remove the gammon from the packaging and put in a bowl. Cover with water and leave to soak. Measure the dried beans and pulses into a measuring jug and add 5 times the volume of water. Leave both overnight.

In the morning, get out the slow cooker and heat to high.

Peel and chop the onion and carrots, and wash and slice the leek. Drain the pulses.

Put the chopped veg and the pulses into a pan, add the stock, bring to the bowl and boil rapidly for 10 minutes, scooping off any scum.

Meanwhile, remove the gammon from the soaking water and add to the slow cooker. Once the stock has boiled for the requisite time, pour the contents of the pan over the gammon, chuck in the cloves and bay leaf, pop the lid on and leave till dinner time.

When you're getting close to dinner time, make the scones.

Cheesey Garlicky Scones

100g plain flour
100g spelt flour
2 tsp baking powder
1 tsp English mustard powder
1 tsp smoked paprika
1/2 tsp salt
1 tsp caster sugar
1 clove of garlic, mashed up
50g unsalted butter diced quite small
150g mature cheddar cheese, diced quite small
1 large egg
4 tbsp low fat natural yoghurt

Preheat the oven to 200C and line a baking tray with greaseproof paper.

Sift the flours, baking powder, mustard powder and smoked paprika into a bowl and combine, then stir in the salt, sugar and garlic.

Add the butter and begin by 'cutting it in' to the flour mix with a knife, then move on to rub the butter in with your fingers till it has almost disappeared.

Stir the cheese through the flour mixture, then whisk together the egg and yoghurt, and combine this with the flour to make a soft dough.

Flour a work surface and your hands, then shape the dough into a rough rectangle/oval (I'm not fussy) about 4 cm thick, then cut into 6 pieces.

Use a palette knife to transfer the scone pieces onto the baking tray and mak sure they have a bit of space between them to expand.

Bake for 25-30 minutes till golden.




While the scones are baking, remove the gammon from the slow cooker to a board or large plate and pull the meat apart using a couple of forks.




 Once shredded, return it to the pot ready to serve.

Serve a steaming bowl of cawl with some cheesey garlicky scones on the side. Rainy day dinner time heaven. 




Enjoy with a side helping of Welsh folk songs. Take it away, Cerys...


Thursday, 16 October 2014

Thai Monkfish Curry

So I may have moaned more than once on here that I never win anything. Well, not since I won 12 bottles of gin via a competition in an 'in-train' magazine on what used to be called the East Coast Mainline...

Well, that streak of not winning was recently broken when I entered a fish recipe into a little competition that Pembrokeshire Fish Week were running earlier this summer, and knock me down with a feather (or a wet fish) - I won!

You can read my winning recipe here - but what I want to tell you about is my prize.

A fantastic box full of delicious fish and shellfish from Claws Shellfish, a Pembrokeshire based .family run seafood company.




After a bit of to'ing and fro'ing, I picked my box up in Haverford West on a Friday afternoon. We had friends coming for the weekend, and I was stressing that I hadn't got the chicken I'd intended to knock up a Thai chicken curry with, out of the freezer.

But I didn't have to worry, because as well as some fresh fish that I could pop straight in the freezer, my box included a dressed crab, a pot of mackerel pate, 4 scallops, some smoked salmon and a cooked lobster. I needed little more than some bread, salad, some chorizo to cook the scallops with (always in my fridge - the chorizo, not the scallops) and some stuffed mini peppers (and a bottle or 2 of white wine) and we had a feast.

The box also included monkfish, salmon, and a lovely piece of haddock all of which went in the freezer at the time, but has been much enjoyed since. I used the salmon in a version of the quickest (and most delish) fish pie ever, using sugar sap peas and full fat creme fraiche for extra creaminess and comfort.

The monkfish was fantastic in a Thai inspired curry recently. It's a fairly firm fish which can take robust flavours and responds well to quick cooking, perfect in this kind of easy but tasty meal.


*****

So what should follow now is a recipe, but I started this post a good 3 weeks ago and forgot to write down the exact ingredients. What I do know is what the photos tell me - which is that I used courgettes and mangetout peas, and served the curry on noodles.



I can also remember that I made the sauce by frying off a couple of tablespoons of shop bought Thai curry paste, adding a tin of coconut milk, and then adding bits of tamarind paste from a block that I bought not long after we moved to Wales, to taste. The paste that I should have used to cook a curry for our friends, but fed them lobster instead...

The addition of the tamarind paste took the edge off the slightly artificial flavour that my (cheap, inferior, bought in a supermarket in a moment of madness, to be honest) Thai curry paste had. I'd been quite worried about dinner before adding the paste in, and frankly, it rescued dinner and created a sauce worthy of the monkfish.

So this serves to tell 2 tales. Firstly, that Claws Shellfish sell fantastic fresh fish and shellfish, and if you have the opportunity, you should visit their stalls in Haverford West or St Davids Farmers Markets, or anywhere else you find their produce. Secondly, that having some tamarind paste in the fridge is a good idea if you are prone to panic buying jars of cheap Thai curry paste.

Hmm.

Monday, 13 October 2014

Smoky sardines and tempting tuna

Of course every one knows that the very best way to eat a tin of sardines is to carry it to a deserted beach on an early Autumn morning. Spend the morning running round, skimming stones, playing chicken with the waves.





As lunchtime approaches, light a fire, open the lid slightly, empty out some of the oil, then soak some kitchen paper in the rest of the oil and stuff it in the top of the tin. Place the tin on a flat rock next to the fire and light the oily kitchen paper. Allow the sardines to get hot and smoky, then eat hungrily...




Granted, this is something that our present location makes more possible for us than it does for others, but even if you're not close to the sea, this is well worth remembering for those occasions when beach fires could be on the cards...

We made good use, then of the tinned sardines and mackerel fillets that were included in a box of goodies that arrived from John West a couple of weeks' ago. 



I guess perhaps we should have done something more adventurous (in a culinary sense) with them, but there's some salmon and tuna left for that - I'm thinking fishcakes - perhaps with some Asian spicing as suggested in the helpful recipe booklet that accompanied the goodies.

What I was more interested in in were the tins of John West Infusions - tuna lightly drizzled with flavoured oils - and the 'Steam Pots' - couscous with a tin of Infusions to stir in after the couscous has been plumped with boiling water - that I received. 






I'm not one for buying 'quick food fixes', tending to go for the raw ingredients and making it from scratch - and any food you might buy with the word 'Pot' in the title has me naturally eyebrow raising, due to associations (intended or otherwise) with MSG-laced noodle affairs, the kind of which you won't catch in my kitchen - no siree...

Tuna Infusions first - in a number of flavours, chilli & garlic, basil, soy & ginger, lemon & thyme, coriander & cumin. These are really really tasty - the tuna is meaty and succulent (although I usually buy tuna in spring water for calorie reasons, tuna in oil really is lush) and the flavours that infuse these pots of loveliness are tasty - not overpoweringly so but give the tuna genuine 'zing', and importantly for me, taste very natural. The Husband and I really enjoyed these, and surprisingly, so did the children. They've never really embraced tuna, but both of them gobbled down these infusions (basil for Pink, Chilli & Garlic - yes, really - for Blue) on top of a jacket potato and pronounced them delicious. Big hits then, and definitely something I'd consider buying again.





The steam pots are essentially pots of dried flavoured couscous plus a complimentary infusion pot. So, Tuna Infusions with Chilli and Garlic and Spicy Red Pepper Couscous, and Tuna infusions with Basil and Sun Dried Tomato Couscous. You get the idea. 





In terms of creating your lunch (or dinner, or whatever) you just add hot water to the couscous and leave to soak for 5 minutes, then stir in the tuna. And despite my misgivings, they are pretty good - and satisfying. I'm a fan of couscous anyway, although wouldn't normally add tuna to it, but the Tuna Infusions work very well in this context. My only gripe is that unlike the Infusion itself, there are far more ingredients creeping into the couscous. Things like potato starch, tomato powder - and quite a lot of sugar and salt. To be honest, I probably wouldn't buy these as a complete package - although I might well buy Tuna Infusions to eat with my own couscous in future - but they are a world away from the noodley horrors that sprang to mind when I saw the name Steam 'POT' - so don't let that put you off.

So there you go - tinned fish has just taken on a whole new dimension for me. And even if my favourite way to eat it is still on a wild, Welsh beach, I'll bet that a few Tuna Infusions start creeping into my cupboards...



Disclaimer: I received a box of various John West products in return for writing this post, but was not required to mention any specific products, and all views expressed are my own, honest opinions.

Saturday, 27 September 2014

Sticky Toffee Cake

All of a sudden, the kids have started to want to do things at the weekends - structured activity type stuff. Pink is going to a little stage school thing which she loves, and Blue has sailing and sometimes kayaking too. 




This is all very irregular. It's bad enough that our Monday and Wednesday evenings are tied up in a whirl of orchestras, brownies, scouts and more kayaking, involving incredibly complicated after school arrangements.

Of course it's not bad that they want to do these things - it's all good stuff - but I always swore I wouldn't be the harassed mother in the car, ferrying her children from activity to activity, and certainly not the tiger mother filling up every spare minute of her children's time, but somehow, driven by the children, this has happened. Not the tiger mother bit - this is all stuff the kids want to do - but definitely the harassed mother bit. And especially on the Mondays and Wednesdays I mentioned. I won't go in to the intricacies of it all, but sometimes it makes my head hurt.

They did stuff before we moved, although it was all in the village, so no need to get in the car, and only during the week - never on a weekend - and if they had wanted to do things on the weekend? Well we'd have just said no. But somehow, all of a sudden, since we've moved, it's crept into the weekend - by stealth - and here we are now...

To be honest, the children wanting to do things on the weekend that don't accord with what we want to do makes life a little awkward. There's an element of confining ourselves to barracks - fitting in around them a little when previously we have pretty much made them fit in with us and our plans. 

On the other hand it was inevitable that they would grow up and start vocalising a desire to do "other things"- I'm just not sure I was expecting it to happen so early. But may be I'm kidding myself that it's 'early' for this to happen. Blue is not far off 11. He no longer goes to bed, Gina Ford-like, at 7 p.m. In fact neither of them do. They are 'up'. And about. When the Husband and I want to collapse in a big heap, Pink is playing her recorder; when I finally finish work which should have been done 'after the kids had gone to bed' except they don't go to bed early enough now, Blue is inevitably sprawled on the sofa watching Top Gear on BBC 3. It's a new phase, clearly - one that we'll have to get used to as we did all the others. Although this one is unlikely to end any time soon (unless we cast them out into the street) and the continued presence on my screen of Messrs Clarkson, Hammond and May is unlikely to ever be something I'm going to get used to.

Anyway the flip side of being at home at the weekend to accommodate all their activities is that there is a bit more time to be more relaxed and recover from the week. To get the washing done, do a bit of sorting out - to bake a cake, leisurely fashion, Radio 4 on in the background...

If you find yourself similarly with time on your hands, I recommend this cake. One of the better ones I've made recently, although don't leave the icing too long before spreading it over the cake - otherwise you will end up doing what I did, gently reheating it, then finding that it split, so I added some icing sugar to it, a bit of sour cream and then desperately beat it in to get it finished before heading off to pick a child up from an activity... I haven't included that part in the recipe.

Sticky Toffee Cake

1 teabag - flavour of choice - I used my fave, lapsang
200g prunes, finely chopped
125g unsalted butter at room temp
200g soft brown sugar
2 tbsp golden syrup
3 large eggs
250g self raising flour
1 tsp bicarbonate of soda

110g unsalted butter
397g tin condensed milk

Butter and flour a 20cm springform cake tin & pre-heat the oven to 180C (160C fan)

Make up the tea bag to 250mls with boiling water, then soak the chopped prunes in the tea for at least 10 minutes.

Cream together the butter and sugar till pale and fluffy, then beat in the syrup.

Beat in the eggs one at a time (add a little flour if the mixture looks like it is splitting) then mix in the flour and bicarbonate of soda, then finally beat in the tea-soaked prunes and any remaining tea.




Scrape the mixture into the prepared tin, then bake for around 55 minutes or until a skewer/cake tester comes out clean.

Leave to cool in the tin before unmolding and icing.

To make up the icing, melt the butter in a heavy based saucepan, then pour in the condensed milk. Stirring vigorously (or whisking) all the time, bring the mixture up to the boil and bubble for 5-10 minutes till it thickens and turns a golden brown colour.

Pour the thickened icing into a bowl and press some greaseproof or clingfilm over the top so that it doesn't form a skin as it cools.




Once the cake is cold and icing is warm (rather than napalm hot) spread the icing over the cake and leave to cool.




Make a cup of tea and enjoy...



If you can wait that long





Friday, 26 September 2014

Apple & Almond Bake

While I don't follow a recipe for crumble topping in terms of the ingredients themselves, I never hold the proportions of flour to sugar to butter in my head. My 'go to' sanity checker (as I may have previously mentioned), is a Delia recipe from her Complete Cookery Course. She recommends flour, sugar and butter - and if you fancy going out on a limb (go on, you know you want to) you could replace some of the flour with oats.

Well, I like to go completely crazy and use ground almonds too, as well as oats, and although I always start off with Delia's proportions, I usually reduce down the sugar especially if I've added sugar to the fruit - which I did on Sunday in fact as I was using up the last of the bullace plums with some more of the apples.

You might say that it's a pointless exercise me even opening the book at all - but I feel like it's become part of the ritual of making crumble, which is after all the pudding I make most often from September to March.

Or it was.

While I was ignoring Delia's crumble instructions in preparation for said crumble last week (it was a very good crumble by the way - a sprinkle of all spice and some brown sugar over the apples & plums - yummers), my eye strayed north on the page to the method of a recipe the ingredients for which are listed on the previous page. Specifically to the phrases "...gently fold in the ground almonds...spread this mixture over the apples...equally good served warm or cold - either way it's nice with some chilled pouring cream"



So yes, you guessed it. Sold to the lady with the insatiable love of all things almond and a bag of windfalls to deal with.

I made this the next day and it is a LOVELY pudding for Autumn or Winter. A bit more faff than a crumble, granted, but the combination of the cooked apples with the almost frangipane topping - well, it's my idea of heaven. 

I expect you'll enjoy it too.

Apple & Almond Bake

4-6 medium/large cooking apples
50g soft brown sugar
110g ground almonds
110g soft, unsalted butter
110g caster sugar
2 large eggs, beaten

You'll also need a baking dish, about 1 litre capacity - butter this.

Pre-heat the oven to 180C

Peel, core and slice the apples. Put them in a pan with the soft brown sugar and a couple of tablespoons of water and cook down till they are starting to break up and go soft and fluffy - how long this takes will depend on the apples you are using. Keep an eye on them and make sure they don't burn.

When they've reached the required state of fluffiness, spread over the bottom of the buttered dish.



Cream together the butter and caster sugar till pale and fluffy, then add the egg a little at a time, beating after every addition. As with a sponge cake, it pays to go slowly here to stop the mixture curdling. But don't worry too much.

Using a metal spoon, fold in the ground almonds, then spread the mixture over the top of the apples, making sure they are evenly covered.



Pop this in the oven on a high shelf and bake for around an hour till golden on top and cooked.

As St Delia says, equally good served hot or cold, and exceptionally good with some cream...


Monday, 22 September 2014

The 2 Minute Beach Clean

No, no cake. Not today at least. After another fabulous weekend enjoying the Indian Summer (yes folks it's alive and well in West Wales) I'm taking 5 minutes to concentrate on one of my other favourite topics.



As you might have guessed from the pics that I manage to sneak on here as frequently as possible (thank your lucky stars you're not my Facebook friend, that's all I can say, if you're getting a little bit sick of them) - I love the beach. In rain, in sun, when it's howling a gale, chucking it down with rain that whips in across the shore, or flat calm. I love swimming in the sea, the feel of the silky water, the salt in my face, sand - or pebbles under my toes. 

Give me a bad beach over a shopping centre, a junk shop, the cinema, a bar absolutely ANY DAY of the year. Although a good beach with either a cup of tea and a piece of cake or a cold beer is even better.

But I digress. The thing is, that even the wild, beautiful, isolated beaches that I'm lucky enough to be frequenting at the moment on the West Wales coast are blighted by one thing. Litter. It may not be litter that's been left by other people who were on the beach, but it's there, washing up from the sea, blowing in on the wind. These wild and beautiful places where you find mars bar wrappers, plastic drink bottles, rope, broken up polystyrene, fishing line. It's no good.



At the risk of sounding super smug, we always take our litter away with us - wherever we are. It's become something of an obsession, making sure that we leave nothing behind, picking up anything that's there regardless of if it came from our picnic bag or not - but it's not enough. There is always someone else's litter, and yes, may be they should have picked it up, but you know, may be they were grappling with a recalcitrant child who didn't want to leave the sandcastle and just didn't notice that the crisp packet had blown away. And if you're a fisherman dealing with the matter of catching fish to earn a living, may be the fact that the offcut of rope was swept into the sea was the least of their worries at the time. The fact is that the litter is there and if it's not picked up, it will stay there - not just blighting the beautiful beach, but acting as a hazard for wild life.
All bagged up and ready to go

So what are the options? Well, you can walk on by. Tut at the state of humanity that leaves its litter lying around but essentially do nothing (smug in the knowledge that your own litter is safely bagged) or you can do what Martin Dorey and Beach Clean encourage us to do and take part in your own 2 minute beach clean.

It makes complete sense. When you're leaving the beach - or perhaps as part of your day, your afternoon, your run or dog walk, spend 2 minutes picking up any litter you find, take it away and dispose of it as you would any rubbish - recycle if possible, or bin it safely. Of course you could extend it to anywhere, too - it's not exclusive to the beach, the damage litter does. Parks, hills, even the street where you live. It's about showing a bit of respect for the environment we live in, taking care of it.


And really, 2 minutes to pick up litter - is that really a problem?


Thursday, 18 September 2014

Bullace cheese

If you didn't know (I didn't), a bullace is somewhere between a damson and a plum. Smaller than the latter, not as sharp as the former - certainly not the 5kg or so I managed to scrump from a friend's trees yesterday morning...




When I say 'scrump' - I was invited - but I really didn't intend to take so many. But the sun was warm, the mood peaceful - the type of weather that literary types might refer to as 'replete' - replete with mellow September sunshine, redolent with birdsong, with the hum of bees, with goodwill and with the sense of a good thing coming gracefully to an end - as summer must eventually do, Indian or otherwise.

The bullaces were literally dropping off the trees as we picked - and although I only had one bag with me, it was too easy to fill as we chatted.

I wasn't in the least prepared, so popped in to the local 'low end' supermarket for sugar and cheap vodka, safe in the knowledge that the best place to start would probably be a little something to cheer up the dark winter nights that I expect are to come. I also bought some gin, but once home realised that I didn't have 2 appropriate receptacles. So I used the vodka and the gin can wait for the sloes...




500g down (enough to pimp a 75cl bottle of average to low-grade vodka), I cast around for other likely ingredient combinations.

3 jars of bullace and stem ginger jam (thanks Sarah Raven) later, and I still had nearly 3 kilos to go. I'd taken the recipe for damson cheese - very similar to 'membrillo' of Spanish cuisine - from my friend. If you haven't come across this before, it's a set fruit 'jelly', to be eaten, sliced rather than spooned, as a savoury - with cheese - or, as we discussed while I was sampling hers, perhaps stirred into gravies and the like. It would taste delicious with lamb as an alternative to redcurrant.

The process is relatively straightforward and has none of the setting point stress I associate with making jam - make a purée, then add sugar and bubble gently down. The recipe even helpfully describes how to tell if the mixture is ready in terms of the sound it will make ("a plop") as well as what it will look like. Marvellous.




As my friend advised, I didn't bother stoning the bullaces before embarking on the cheese. I'd already stoned over a kilo to achieve the required weight for the jam making, and it was a total pain (not to mention making my already inelegant fingernails look even worse - I had some vivid cherry flashbacks as I cursed my way through them) - and as you sieve the purée anyway, I decided to heed her advice. I'd noted that about 1.25kg of whole fruit yielded a kilo of stoned when making the jam, so worked on that basis.

It takes a little time, but the resulting cheese is really delicious, and I can see it cheering up many a winter evening to come. I could also venture to suggest that the little packages of fruity delightfulness would make appropriate offerings for that festival beginning with C that comes up in 3 months time. But as it's only September, I can't bring myself to elaborate further on that subject...

Bullace (or Damson) cheese

Ingredients

- 2.5 kg bullaces, washed, stalks and any stray leaves etc removed.
- granulated sugar (exact amounts depend on the amount of purée you achieve after the first stage - you need 450-600g sugar for every 600ml (1lb for every pint if you're imperial) of purée depending on how tart the purée tastes - and perhaps how tart you think you'd like your finished product)
- 50g unsalted butter (optional)

Method

Put the bullaces in a large heavy based pan - if you're a jam maker, the jam pan will do nicely, and add 600ml water.

Bring to a boil and simmer, occasionally mashing the bullaces with a potato masher, until you have a thick, syrupy pulp which will be beautifully pink - this takes about 30-40 minutes.




Sieve this pulp in batches. I must confess to sieving it all and then going to bed because it was late and I was tired. So if you're still going at this point, measure as you go to work out how much sugar you need. If you're a lightweight like me, when you're ready for stage 2 (and I expect the puree would freeze well if needed) measure the puree.

Add sugar accordingly - 450g for each 600ml of puree - then return to the pan and add the butter (if using - apparently it makes for a mellower cheese). 

Heat gently to dissolve all the sugar, then bring to a simmer and continue to cook gently for as long as it takes to achieve a thick glossy paste that "plops and sticks to a wooden spoon or will levae a clear trail is the spoon is drawn across the bottom of the pan". It took mine closer to 11/2 hours before I was confident I'd reached the right point.




At this point, you need to oil whatever receptacles you are going to use to set the cheese in. Ramekins will work, jam jars to make bigger portions, or you could make a big slab in a loaf tin. You could also, I guess, make 'cubes' using ice cube trays if that doesn't re-open any Annabel Karmel babyweaning type scars for you... *

Sterilise your pots, dry and lightly oil them, then spoon in the cheese and leave to cool.

Turn the cooled cheese out of the moulds and wrap in waxed paper. 

Apparently, you should leave it for 6-8 weeks before eating. And it'll last for up to 2 years.





Well, it's always good to know the theories, isn't it?


_____________________________________________________________________
* I didn't have quite enough to fill a final ramekin, and because the Pink one was home, 'poorly' and gave me the idea for it, I spread the last bit out on a piece of greasproof paper to see if I could re-create the 'fruit leather' that is so popular in my children's peers' lunch boxes and which I refuse to buy...



When it was cool, I cut it into strips and rolled it up. Eat your heart out, Annabel Karmel...


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